AIACA|

The AIA California Board of Directors regularly takes positions on legislation that impacts the profession, whether that impact is positive or negative. 

There is a process to establish these positions.

  • Over 2,000 introduced legislative bills are looked at or read.
  • Around 200 bills of interest to the profession are pulled aside for review by various committees of AIA CA
  • The Advocacy Advisory Committee, Urban Design Committee, and Climate Action Committee review bills that are within their area of knowledge, and make recommendations to the Board (e.g. Support, Oppose, or seek and amendment).

Here are the Board Adopted positions on legislation, as of May 10, 2022.

 

  

 

 

 

 

AB 682

(Bloom D)   Planning and zoning: density bonuses: cohousing buildings.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, commonly referred to as the Density Bonus Law, requires a city or county to provide a developer that proposes a housing development within the city or county with a density bonus and other incentives or concessions, as specified, if the developer agrees to construct, among other options, specified percentages of units for moderate-income, lower income, or very low income households and meets other requirements. This bill would additionally require that a density bonus be provided under these provisions to a developer who agrees to construct a housing development that is a cohousing building, as defined, that meets specified requirements and will contain either 10% of the total square footage for lower income households, as defined, or 5% of the total square footage for very low income households, as defined. The bill would prohibit the city, county, or city and county from requiring any minimum unit size requirements or minimum bedroom requirements in conflict with the bill’s provisions, requirement for the project to provide private open space, or maximum limit on density with respect to a cohousing building eligible for a density bonus under these provisions. The bill would also make a technical change to the Density Bonus Law by deleting certain duplicative provisions. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oppose 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AB 902

(O’Donnell D)   School facilities: alternative design-build contracts.

 

 

Summary: (1)Until January 1, 2025, existing law authorizes a school district, with the approval of the governing board of the school district, to procure design-build contracts for public works projects in excess of $1,000,000, awarding the contract to either the low bid or the best value, as provided.This bill would authorize, until January 1, 2029, a school district that has an average daily attendance of over 50,000 pupils, with the approval of the governing board of the school district, to procure alternative design-build contracts for public works projects in excess of $10,000,000, awarding the contract to either the low bid or the best value, as provided. The bill would define “alternative design-build” as a project delivery process in which both the design and construction of a project are procured from a single design-build entity based on its proposed design cost, general conditions, overhead, and profit as a component of the project price. The bill would require specified information to be verified under penalty of perjury. By expanding the crime of perjury, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AB 916

(Salas D)   Zoning: accessory dwelling units: bedroom addition.

 

 

Summary: The Planning and Zoning Law authorizes the legislative body of any county or city to adopt ordinances that regulate the use of buildings, structures, and land as between industry, business, residences, open space, and other purposes.This bill would prohibit a city or county legislative body from dopting or enforcing an ordinance requiring a public hearing as a condition of adding space for additional bedrooms or reconfiguring existing space to increase the bedroom count within an existing house, condominium, apartment, or dwelling. The bill would include findings that ensuring adequate housing is a matter of statewide concern and is not a municipal affair, and that the provision applies to all cities, including charter cities. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AB 1369

(Bennett D)   Buy Clean California Act: eligible materials: product-specific global warming potential emissions.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, the Buy Clean California Act, requires the Department of General Services, by January 1, 2022, to establish and publish in the State Contracting Manual, in a department management memorandum, or on the department’s internet website, a maximum acceptable global warming potential for each category of eligible materials, set at the industry average of facility-specific global warming potential emissions for that material, expressed as specified. Existing law defines eligible materials for those purposes to mean carbon steel rebar, flat glass, mineral wool board insulation, or structural steel.This bill would define eligible materials to additionally include gypsum board, insulation, carpet and carpet tiles, and ceiling tiles. The bill would also require the department, by January 1, 2024, to establish and publish a maximum acceptable global warming potential for each category of eligible materials, set at the industry average of product-specific global warming potential emissions for those materials, expressed as specified. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AB 1551

(Santiago D)   Planning and zoning: development bonuses: mixed-use projects.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, commonly referred to as the Density Bonus Law, requires a city or county to provide a developer that proposes a housing development within the city or county with a density bonus and other incentives or concessions, as specified, if the developer agrees to construct specified percentages of units for lower income, very low income, or senior citizen housing, among other things, and meets other requirements. Previously existing law, until January 1, 2022, required a city, county, or city and county to grant a commercial developer a development bonus, as specified, when an applicant for approval of a commercial development had entered into an agreement for partnered housing with an affordable housing developer to contribute affordable housing through a joint project or 2 separate projects encompassing affordable housing.This bill would reenact the above-described provisions regarding the granting of development bonuses to certain projects. The bill would require a city or county to annually submit to the Department of Housing and Community Development information describing an approved commercial development bonus. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2028. By adding to the duties of local planning officials, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Voepel R)   Building standards: photovoltaic requirements: accessory dwelling units.

 

 

AB 1674

(Voepel R)   Building standards: photovoltaic requirements: accessory dwelling units.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, the California Building Standards Law, establishes the California Building Standards Commission within the Department of General Services and requires state agencies that adopt or propose adoption of any building standard to submit the building standard to the commission for approval and adoption. Existing law requires the commission to approve and adopt building standards, to codify those standards in the California Building Standards Code, and to publish, or cause to be published, editions of the code in its entirety once every 3 years.This bill would prohibit an accessory dwelling unit, as defined, from being considered to be a newly constructed building for purposes of a specified provision of the California Energy Code, which is part of the California Building Standards Code, regarding the photovoltaic requirements for newly constructed buildings that are low-rise residential buildings. The bill would require the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, commonly known as the Energy Commission, to study exempting accessory dwelling units from specified photovoltaic requirements and make recommendations to the California Building Standards Commission in time for consideration and adoption in the next regularly occurring California Building Standards Code adoption cycle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Santiago D)   Affordable housing loan and grant programs: adaptive reuse.

 

AB 1695

(Santiago D)   Affordable housing loan and grant programs: adaptive reuse.

 

 

Summary: Existing law establishes various programs and funding sources administered by the Department of Housing and Community Development to enable the development of affordable housing, including, among others, the Building Homes and Jobs Act, the Multifamily Housing Program, and the Housing for a Healthy California Program. This bill would provide that any notice of funding availability issued by the department for an affordable multifamily housing loan and grant program shall state that adaptive reuse of a property for affordable housing purposes is an eligible activity. The bill would define “adaptive reuse” for these purposes to mean the retrofitting and repurposing of an existing building to create new residential units.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Medina D)   Public works: fees: small business.

 

AB 1727

(Medina D)   Public works: fees: small business.

 

 

Summary: Existing law defines “public works,” for the purposes of regulating public works contracts, as, among other things, construction, alteration, demolition, installation, or repair work done under contract and paid for, in whole or in part, out of public funds. Existing law further requires that, except as specified, not less than the general prevailing rate of per diem wages be paid to workers employed on public works and imposes misdemeanor penalties for a willful violation of this requirement. Existing law generally requires a contractor or subcontractor to be registered with the Department of Industrial Relations to be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or engage in the performance of any public work contract. Existing law requires a contractor or subcontractor to meet specific conditions to qualify for this registration, including, among other things, to pay a $400 application fee to qualify for registration and to pay an annual renewal fee. This bill would reduce the application and annual renewal fee for a small business, as defined, to $200. The bill would prohibit the application and renewal fee for a contractor or subcontractor that does not qualify as a small business from being increased to support the above-described fee decrease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Boerner Horvath D)   Building standards: installation of electric vehicle charging stations: existing buildings.

 

AB 1738

(Boerner Horvath D)   Building standards: installation of electric vehicle charging stations: existing buildings.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, the California Building Standards Law, establishes the California Building Standards Commission within the Department of General Services. Existing law requires the Department of Housing and Community Development to propose to the commission for consideration mandatory building standards for the installation of future electric vehicle charging infrastructure for parking spaces in multifamily dwellings, as specified. Existing law requires the commission to adopt, approve, codify, and publish mandatory building standards for the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure for parking spaces in multifamily dwellings and nonresidential development. Existing law requires the commission to approve and adopt building standards and to codify those standards in the California Building Standards Code. This bill would recast these provisions to instead require mandatory building standards for the installation of electric vehicle charging stations with Level 2 or direct current fast charger electric vehicle supply equipment, as defined, to be researched, developed, and proposed for adoption (1) by the Department of Housing and Community Development for the installation in existing parking facilities serving multifamily dwellings, hotels, and motels and (2) by the commission for the installation in parking facilities serving existing nonresidential buildings, as specified. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oppose 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Boerner Horvath D)   Personal Income Tax Law: Corporation Tax Law: credits: electric vehicle charging stations.

 

AB 1873

(Boerner Horvath D)   Personal Income Tax Law: Corporation Tax Law: credits: electric vehicle charging stations.

 

 

Summary: The Personal Income Tax Law and the Corporation Tax Law allow various credits against the taxes imposed by those laws. This bill would allow a credit against those taxes for each taxable year beginning on or after January 1, 2025, and before January 1, 2030, in an amount equal to 40% of the amount paid or incurred in qualified costs by a qualified taxpayer during the taxable year for the installation of specified electric vehicle supply equipment in a covered multifamily dwelling, subject to certain maximum credit amounts. The bill would define various terms for these purposes. The bill would repeal these provisions as of December 1, 2030. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Villapudua D)   Housing: EO N-06-19 State Land Affordable Housing Infrastructure, Demolition, Abatement, and Remediation Fund: grant program.

 

AB 2049

 

(Villapudua D)   Housing: EO N-06-19 State Land Affordable Housing Infrastructure, Demolition, Abatement, and Remediation Fund: grant program.

 

 

Summary: Existing law establishes the Department of General Services in the Government Operations Agency. By executive order, the Governor requires the department to create a digitized inventory of all state-owned parcels that are in excess of state agencies’ foreseeable needs, as provided, and to issue, in consultation with the Department of Housing and Community Development, requests for proposals on individual parcels and accept proposals from developers of affordable housing interested in entering into low-cost, long-term ground leases of these parcels, as described.This bill would establish the EO N-06-19 State Land Affordable Housing Infrastructure, Demolition, Abatement, and Remediation Fund and would make moneys in the fund available, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to an unspecified state agency for purposes of establishing and administering a grant program, as specified. The bill would require the state agency to establish, upon appropriation by the Legislature, the grant program and would require the grant program to meet specified requirements, including that the grant be for the construction of infrastructure, demolition of existing buildings, abatement, or remediation of qualified development projects, as defined, on qualified property, as defined. The bill would require specified grants moneys awarded to the developer that are not used when the qualified development project is completed to be returned to the state agency and deposited into the fund. The bill would require the state agency to implement rules and regulations for purposes of administering the grant program, including as specified. The bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact subsequent legislation designating a state agency to administer the fund.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Berman D)   Density bonuses: affordable housing impact fees.

 

AB 2063

(Berman D)   Density bonuses: affordable housing impact fees.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, known as the Density Bonus Law, requires a city or county to provide a developer that proposes a housing development in the city or county with a density bonus and other incentives or concessions for the production of lower income housing units, or for the donation of land within the development, if the developer agrees to, among other things, construct a specified percentage of units for very low income, low-income, or moderate-income households or qualifying residents, including lower income students. Existing law requires the amount of a density bonus and the number of incentives or concessions a qualifying developer receives to be pursuant to a certain formula based on the total number of units in the housing development, as specified. Existing law prohibits affordable housing impact fees, including inclusionary zoning fees and in-lieu fees, from being imposed on a housing development’s affordable units. This bill would prohibit affordable housing impact fees, including inclusionary zoning fees and in-lieu fees, from being imposed on a housing development’s density bonus units, unless the city, county, or city and county has adopted a local density bonus ordinance or established a local housing program on or before January 1, 2022, that allows for a density bonus of at least 50% for any for-sale or rental housing development containing restricted affordable units that dedicates a specified percentage of units for extremely low, very low, low-, or moderate-income households. By imposing new restrictions on the ability of a local government to impose affordable housing impact fees, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oppose 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Holden D)   Embodied carbon emissions: construction materials.

 

AB 2446

(Holden D)   Embodied carbon emissions: construction materials.

 

 

Summary: The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The act requires the state board to adopt rules and regulations to achieve the maximum technologically feasible and cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions reductions and to ensure that statewide greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to at least 40% below the statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit no later than December 31, 2030. Existing law requires the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission to adopt regulations on building design and construction standards that increase efficiency in the use of energy and water for new residential and nonresidential buildings, and energy and water conservation performance standards for new residential and nonresidential buildings. This bill would require the commission to develop a framework for measuring and then reducing carbon intensity in the construction of new buildings, including those for residential uses. The bill would require the commission to design the framework to achieve an 80% net reduction, as compared to 2020 levels, in the carbon intensity of construction and materials used in new construction by 2045, with interim goals of 20% below 2020 levels by 2030 and 40% below 2020 levels by 2035. The bill would require the commission to take certain actions to facilitate the achievement of these goals. This bill contains other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Garcia, Eduardo D)   Energy: firm renewable energy resources and firm zero-carbon resources: procurement.

 

AB 2587

(Garcia, Eduardo D)   Energy: firm renewable energy resources and firm zero-carbon resources: procurement.

 

 

Summary: Existing law requires the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission), in consultation with the Public Utilities Commission, the Independent System Operator, and the State Air Resources Board, on or before December 31, 2023, to submit to the Legislature an assessment of the firm zero-carbon resources that support a clean, reliable, and resilient electrical grid in California and will achieve the policy of the state that eligible renewable energy resources and zero-carbon resources supply 100% of all retail sales of electricity to California end-use customers and 100% of electricity procured to serve all state agencies by December 31, 2045, as specified. Existing law requires the Energy Commission to prepare an integrated energy policy report every 2 years and to timely incorporate firm zero-carbon resources into the integrated energy policy report. Existing law requires the commission to adopt a process for each load-serving entity, as defined, to file an integrated resource plan and a schedule for periodic updates to the plan to ensure that load-serving entities accomplish specified objectives. This bill would require the Energy Commission to additionally include firm renewable energy resources in the above-described assessment and to incorporate firm renewable energy resources into the integrated energy policy report. The bill would require the Public Utilities Commission to include the findings and recommendations related to the availability and need for procurement of firm renewable energy resources and firm zero-carbon resources made in the above-described assessment in the above-described integrated resource plan process no later than 6 months from the time the assessment is presented to the Legislature. The bill would require the Public Utilities Commission, as part of including the findings and recommendations, to consider whether to adopt additional programs, measures, and requirements to increase the procurement and deployment of firm renewable energy resources and firm zero-carbon resources, and to consider emerging technologies, as specified. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Quirk-Silva D)   Housing: fire safety standards.

 

AB 2705

(Quirk-Silva D)   Housing: fire safety standards.

 

 

Summary: Existing law requires the State Fire Marshal to prepare, adopt, and submit building standards and other fire and life safety regulations to the California Building Standards Commission for approval establishing minimum requirements for the storage, handling, and use of hazardous materials. Existing law requires the State Fire Marshal to seek the advice of the Secretary for Environmental Protection in establishing those requirements. This bill would prohibit the legislative body of a city or county from approving a discretionary entitlement, as defined, that would result in a new residential development project, as defined, being located within a very high fire hazard severity zone, unless the city or county finds that the residential development project will meet specified standards intended to address wildfire risks, as specified, and would provide that these provisions do not limit or prohibit a legislative body of a city or county from adopting more stringent standards. By imposing new requirements on cities and counties in the review of residential development projects, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Bennett D)   California Building Standards Commission: recycled water: nonpotable water systems.

 

AB 2811

(Bennett D)   California Building Standards Commission: recycled water: nonpotable water systems.

 

 

Summary: The California Building Standards Law provides for the adoption of building standards by state agencies by requiring all state agencies that adopt or propose adoption of any building standard to submit the building standard to the California Building Standards Commission for approval and adoption. Existing law requires the commission to conduct research to assist in the development of mandatory green building standards for the installation of recycled water systems for newly constructed commercial and public buildings, in consultation with the State Water Resources Control Board and other interested parties.This bill would require, commencing January 1, 2024, all newly constructed nonresidential buildings be constructed with dual plumbing to allow the use of recycled water for all applicable nonpotable water demands, as defined, if that building is located within an existing or planned recycled water service area, as specified. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oppose 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Low D)   Certified Access Specialist Inspection Grant Program.

 

AB 2829

(Low D)   Certified Access Specialist Inspection Grant Program.

 

 

Summary: Existing law prohibits discrimination on the basis of various specified personal characteristics, including disability. Existing law establishes standards for making new construction and existing facilities accessible to persons with disabilities and provides for construction-related accessibility claims for violations of those standards. Existing law requires the State Architect to establish and publicize a program for the voluntary certification by the state of any person who meets specified criteria as a certified access specialist (CASp) to inspect, among other things, businesses for compliance with accessibility building standards. Existing law requires the State Architect to publish and regularly update a list CASps and a list of businesses that have been inspected by a CASp. Existing law requires the State Architect to develop a process by which a business may notify the State Architect that a structure or area has had a CASp inspection and to develop a form for businesses to notify the public that the business has obtained a CASp inspection. This bill, until January 1, 2028, would establish the Certified Access Specialist Inspection Grant Program to assist small businesses in obtaining CASp inspections, and would require the State Architect to administer the program. The bill would authorize small businesses, defined to mean a business with fewer than 50 employees, as specified, with a physical property in the state, to apply for a grant for a CASp inspection of the small business’s property, in an amount equal to the actual cost of the inspection, not to exceed $3,000 per inspection. The bill would require the State Architect to develop an application and to develop criteria to evaluate and award the grants, as specified, and would require the State Architect to annually submit a report to the Legislature on the results of the program. The bill would appropriate an unspecified amount from the General Fund to the Certified Access Specialist Fund, a continuously appropriated fund, for purposes of the program. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Support 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Wiener D)   Residential solar energy systems: permitting.

 

SB 379

(Wiener D)   Residential solar energy systems: permitting.

 

 

Summary: Existing law requires a city or county to approve administratively applications to install solar energy systems through the issuance of a building permit or similar nondiscretionary permit. Existing law requires every city, county, or city and county to develop a streamlined permitting process for the installation of small residential rooftop solar energy systems, as that term is defined. Existing law prescribes and limits permit fees that a city or county may charge for a residential and commercial solar energy system. Existing law creates the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission) in the Natural Resources Agency and prescribes its duties, which include administering programs for the installation of solar energy systems.This bill would require every city, county, or city and county to implement an online, automated permitting platform that verifies code compliance and issues permits in real time for a solar energy system, as defined, that is no larger than 38.4 kilowatts alternating current nameplate rating and an energy storage system, as defined, paired with a solar energy system that is no larger than 38.4 kilowatts alternating current nameplate rating. The bill would require a city, county, or city and county to amend a certain ordinance to authorize a solar energy system and an energy storage system to use the online, automated permitting platform. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oppose 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Wiener D)   California Environmental Quality Act: exemption: public universities: university housing development projects.

 

SB 886

(Wiener D)   California Environmental Quality Act: exemption: public universities: university housing development projects.

 

 

Summary: The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of an environmental impact report on a project that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. This bill would, until January 1, 2030, exempt from CEQA a university housing development project, as defined, carried out by a public university, as defined, on real property owned by the public university if the project meets certain requirements and the project is not located, in whole or in part, on certain sites, including a site that is within a special flood hazard area subject to inundation by a 1% annual chance flood or within a regulatory floodway as determined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as provided. The bill, with respect to a site that is within a special flood hazard area subject to inundation by a 1% annual chance flood or within a regulatory floodway, would prohibit a local government from denying an application on the basis that a public university did not comply with any additional permit requirement, standard, or action adopted by that local government applicable to the site if the public university is able to satisfy all applicable federal qualifying criteria in order to demonstrate that the site meets these criteria and is otherwise eligible to be exempt from CEQA pursuant to the above requirements. By imposing additional duties on local governments, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would provide that a university housing development project is not exempt from CEQA if, among other things, the project would require the demolition of specified housing or a historic structure that is listed on a national, state, or local historic register. The bill would require the public university to hold at least one noticed public hearing to hear and respond to public comments before determining that the university housing development project is exempt under the bill’s provision. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oppose 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Stern D)   Energy: building energy efficiency: document repository and registry.

 

SB 1164

(Stern D)   Energy: building energy efficiency: document repository and registry.

 

 

Summary: Existing law requires the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission to prescribe, by regulation, building design and construction standards and energy and water conservation design standards for new residential and nonresidential buildings. Existing law requires the commission to prescribe, by regulation, standards for minimum levels of operating efficiency to promote the use of energy-efficient and water-efficient appliances whose use requires a significant amount of energy or water on a statewide basis. Existing law requires the commission to approve a plan that will promote compliance with specified regulations in the installation of central air conditioning and heat pumps and authorizes the commission to adopt regulations to increase compliance with permitting and inspection requirements for central air conditioning and heat pumps, and associated sales and installations, consistent with that plan. This bill would require the commission, on or before January 1, 2024, to submit to the Legislature a report proposing a statewide compliance document repository and data registry that would register and store compliance, installation, and acceptance test documentation required by the regulations specified above, as provided, and a report proposing a statewide heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment sales registry and compliance tracking system to identify the installation of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment done without permit or testing of proper performance, as provided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Allen D)   Public restrooms: building standards.

 

 

 

 

SB 1194

(Allen D)   Public restrooms: building standards.

 

 

Summary: Existing law requires a public agency, as defined, that serves the public or is open to the public and maintains toilet facilities to make those facilities available to the public free of charge. Existing law, the California Building Standards Law, establishes the California Building Standards Commission within the Department of General Services. Existing law requires the commission to approve and adopt building standards and to codify those standards in the California Building Standards Code.This bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to require, by ordinance or resolution, that public restrooms constructed within its jurisdiction comply with specified requirements instead of complying with the plumbing standards set forth in the California Building Standards Code. This bill would, except as specified, require public restroom facilities to be designed to serve all genders, as specified. The bill would give a city, county, or city and county discretion to exclude certain occupancies from the bill’s requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Stern D)   Land use: development restriction: fire hazard severity zones.

 

SB 1292

(Stern D)   Land use: development restriction: fire hazard severity zones.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, the Planning and Zoning Law, requires each county and city to adopt a comprehensive, long-term general plan for the physical development of the county or city, and specified land outside its boundaries, that includes, among other mandatory elements, a housing element. Existing law requires the housing element to include, among other things, an inventory of land suitable and available for residential development. Existing law imposes various requirements on a city, county, or city and county upon receiving an application for a housing development project meeting certain standards. This bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to restrict the development of residential housing in moderate, high, and very high fire hazard severity zones, as defined, if the city, county, or city and county adopts a plan, as specified, ensuring the production of at least double the number of residential units not developed as a result of the restriction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Cortese D)   Low-embodied carbon building materials: carbon sequestration.

 

SB 1297

(Cortese D)   Low-embodied carbon building materials: carbon sequestration.

 

 

Summary: The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. Existing law requires the state board, by July 1, 2023, to develop a comprehensive strategy for the state’s cement sector to achieve net zero-emissions of greenhouse gases used within the state as soon as possible, but no later than December 31, 2045. This bill would require the Energy Commission, in consultation with specified state agencies and other entities, to develop a plan as part of the 2023 Integrated Energy Policy Report to advance low-carbon materials and methods in building and construction projects that details a strategy and recommendations to minimize embodied carbon and maximize carbon sequestration in building materials, as provided. The bill would require the state board to develop an accounting protocol to quantify embodied carbon and carbon sequestration in building materials. Following the adoption of that protocol, the bill would require the Natural Resources Agency to incorporate, as appropriate, projects using low-embodied carbon building materials or carbon sequestration in building materials into the California Carbon Sequestration and Climate Resiliency Project Registry. The bill would require the Office of Planning and Research to evaluate the circumstances in which the use of low-embodied carbon building materials or carbon sequestration in building materials is an acceptable mitigation measure pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Wieckowski D)   Adaptive reuse projects: by-right: funding.

 

SB 1369

(Wieckowski D)   Adaptive reuse projects: by-right: funding.

 

 

Summary: The Planning and Zoning Law requires the legislative body of each county and city to adopt a comprehensive, long-term general plan for the physical development of the county or city that includes, among other mandatory elements, a housing element. Under that law, supportive housing, as defined, is a use by right in zones where multifamily and mixed uses are permitted if the developer provides the planning agency with a plan for providing supportive services and the proposed housing development meets specified criteria. The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires a lead agency, as defined, to prepare, or cause to be prepared, and certify the completion of, an environmental impact report on a project that it proposes to carry out or approve that may have a significant effect on the environment or to adopt a negative declaration if it finds that the project will not have that effect. CEQA does not apply to the approval of ministerial projects. This bill would make an adaptive reuse project a use by right in all areas regardless of zoning. The bill would define “adaptive reuse project” to mean any commercial, public, industrial, or office building or structure that has 25-percent occupancy or less, which is converted into a housing development project. The bill would define “use by right” to mean that the city or county’s review of the adaptive reuse project may not require a conditional use permit, planned unit development permit, or other discretionary city or county review or approval that would constitute a “project” for purposes of CEQA, as specified. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Cortese D)   Electricity: multifamily housing local solar program.

 

SB 1385

(Cortese D)   Electricity: multifamily housing local solar program.

 

 

Summary: Existing law vests the Public Utilities Commission with regulatory authority over public utilities, including electrical corporations. Under existing law, the Green Tariff Shared Renewables Program requires an electrical corporation with 100,000 or more customers in California to file with the commission an application requesting approval of a tariff to implement a program enabling ratepayers to participate directly in offsite electrical generation facilities that use eligible renewable energy resources. Existing law requires the commission, by June 30, 2017, to authorize, through the Multifamily Affordable Housing Solar Roofs Program, the awarding of monetary incentives for qualifying solar energy systems that are installed on qualified multifamily affordable housing properties through December 31, 2030.This bill would require the commission, on or before January 1, 2024, to establish a new multifamily housing local solar program that would require each electrical corporation with more than 100,000 service connections in California to construct, or contract for the construction of, a solar and storage system on or near qualified multifamily housing, as specified. The bill would require the commission, when the installed capacity of the program reaches 500 megawatts, to evaluate the program, as provided. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Wieckowski D)   Carbon Capture Technology Demonstration Project Grant Program.

 

SB 1399

(Wieckowski D)   Carbon Capture Technology Demonstration Project Grant Program.

 

 

Summary: Existing law establishes in the Natural Resources Agency the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, consisting of 5 members appointed by the Governor. Existing law requires the commission, among other things, to carry out, or cause to be carried out under contract or other arrangements, research and development into alternative sources of energy, improvements in energy generation, transmission, and siting, fuel substitution, and other topics related to energy supply, demand, public safety, ecology, and conservation that are of particular statewide importance. This bill would require the commission, on or before September 30, 2024, and contingent upon an appropriation of funds by the Legislature, to establish the Carbon Capture Technology Demonstration Project Grant Program, including program goals and objectives, to deploy and commercialize carbon capture technologies that will significantly improve the efficiency, effectiveness, cost, emissions reductions, and environmental performance of existing industrial facilities, natural gas electric generation facilities, and biomass electric generation facilities, as provided. The bill would require the commission to coordinate with specified government entities to establish goals and objectives for the program. This bill contains other related provisions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Roth D)   The Department of Consumer Affairs.

 

SB 1443

(Roth D)   The Department of Consumer Affairs.

 

 

Summary:  Under existing law, the Department of Consumer Affairs is comprised of various boards, bureaus, commissions, committees, and similarly constituted agencies that license and regulate the practice of various professions and vocations. This bill would continue in existence several of these boards, bureaus, and commissions, including the Dental Board of California, the California Board of Accountancy, and the California Architects Board, among others, until January 1, 2025, and make related conforming changes. This bill contains other related provisions and other existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Allen D)   Building standards: electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

SB 1482

(Allen D)   Building standards: electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

 

Summary: Existing law, the California Building Standards Law, establishes the California Building Standards Commission within the Department of General Services. Existing law requires the commission to approve and adopt building standards and to codify those standards in the California Building Standards Code. Existing law requires the commission to adopt, approve, codify, and publish mandatory building standards for the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure for parking spaces in multifamily dwellings and nonresidential development. Existing law requires the Department of Housing and Community Development to propose to the commission for consideration mandatory building standards for the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure for parking spaces in multifamily dwellings and submit the proposed mandatory building standards. Existing law requires the department and the commission, in proposing and adopting these standards, to actively consult with specified parties.This bill would require those mandatory building standards for the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure for parking spaces in multifamily dwellings to require that each dwelling unit with access to a parking space have access to a 208/240 volt branch circuit of at least 20 amperes terminating in a receptacle for use by an electric vehicle driver to charge their plug-in electric vehicle, specified signage for those electric vehicle parking spaces, and electrical wiring design options, as specified. The bill would provide for additional parties that the commission and the department would be required to consult with in proposing and adopting these standards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AIA California
AIA California
Celebrating over 75 years of service, the AIA California actively promotes the value of design and advocates for the architectural profession. AIA CA is an association of 11,000 dedicated and passionate members who share a commitment to design excellence and livability in California’s natural and built environments.

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