Healthcare Facilities Forum|

Some experience Zoom Fatigue in our new day-to-day lives. Between work meetings, children’s art classes, yoga practice, the Zoom is on consistently. Which is why people take a beat before registering for yet another virtual conference. However, nearly 200 healthcare designers, hospital administration, and other interested parties,  attended AIA California’s 2021 Healthcare Facilities Forum in order to learn what this new structure in the Western Hemisphere’s way of living means to the healthcare field.

On September 9 -10, experts in the healthcare design industry gathered as keynote speakers, and panelists to discuss the long lasting effects of the pandemic. From telemedicine services to more flexible in-facility space, the cause and effect of how the current state of affairs is impacting cost, operations, care delivery, safety, and utilization was examined, analyzed, and left many inspired.

And as for Healthcare Facilities Forum 2022, perhaps it will be in person. As Clark said, “There is no denying that we all miss the lively interaction of being in-person and having the one-on-one conversations with our speakers and colleagues.  Virtual meetings are still better than no meetings at all and I’ve heard so much positive feedback from attendees.”

Some highlights and key takeaways from attendees:

“So many great take a ways this year’s conference.  Flexibility is still king when designing hospitals and clinics and no matter how smart you think your project is, there are still more opportunities to add in more flexibility! We learned that some systems are designing all med-surg beds with the ability to convert to ICU’s and hospitals, technology is helping to improve patient experiences and health systems are looking at ways to treat more patients with in-home care.

Panelist Zig Rubel, FAIA, Founder of DA+C advised, “A lot of healthcare providers aren’t scooping up the ‘low hanging fruit’ – that’s why they’re going to retail healthcare and that’s putting more stress on the healthcare systems.” He asked attendees to focus on the signal, not the noise in regard to healthcare data.

Jill Tomcyck, University of California, Davis Associate Director Health Facilities Design & Construction commented on adaptive reuse:

“It’s difficult given the seismic safety requirements for these types of facilities, but the healthcare systems/clients rely on the expertise of the industry to keep (clients) up to date and possibilities!”

AIA CA Executive Vice President, Nicki Dennis Stephens, Hon. AIA, mentioned she heard the word “flexibility” at least 50 times. And that is not hyperbole as others were quoted with the same:

“There’s a lot of need for behavioral health, skilled nursing, outpatient surgery- might be opportunities for reuse (keep the license current for the building – gives opportunities for flexibility in the future!”

And as for Healthcare Facilities Forum 2022, perhaps it will be in person. As Clark said, “There is no denying that we all miss the lively interaction of being in-person and having the one-on-one conversations with our speakers and colleagues.  Virtual meetings are still better than no meetings at all and I’ve heard so much positive feedback from attendees.”

AIA California
AIA California
Celebrating over 75 years of service, the AIA California actively promotes the value of design and advocates for the architectural profession. AIA CA is an association of 11,000 dedicated and passionate members who share a commitment to design excellence and livability in California’s natural and built environments.

Comments are closed.

We use cookies to personalize content, to provide social media features and to analyze our traffic.
By continuing to use this website, you consent to the use of cookies.