Winning Record

A Track Record of Success

The architectural profession is at the leading edge of many issues that face our state. AIA California has a proven track record authoring or supporting legislation, actively participating in the regulatory arena in these areas and more.

This work includes: 

  • climate action in the built environment 
  • professional practice
  • Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
  • fostering more livable communities
  • developing policies that address California’s housing crisis
  • promoting innovation in healthcare facility design
  • promoting school safety

Discover select highlights and proven success in advocacy below.

//highlights
Solid Graphic ProtectionCopyright

Protection + Copyright

  • Prohibited the unauthorized duplication and dissemination of architects’ work by California agencies on digital platforms
  • Successfully sponsored legislation that states a person may not use an architect’s instrument of services without the written authorization of the architect. Protects the architect when the architect’s client sells the land along with the approved set of plans to another person who has no contractual arrangement with the architect
  • Shielded the profession by requiring architects approve a change “in writing” in order to be held liable for changes
Solid Graphic Business

Business

  • Monitor the State Board of Equalization to ensure certain architectural services are not incorrectly subjected to the state sales tax
  • Strongly supported the multi-year effort to enact meaningful reforms in state law that limits the obligation of a design professional to defend its client. Under SB 496, signed into law, a design professional’s share of defense costs cannot exceed its percentage of fault
  • Give architects advanced warning that they will be a defendant in a lawsuit by requiring the Certificate of Merit be served on the architect
Solid Graphic Regulations

Building Regulations

  • Reduce the cost to construct community college facilities by supporting the effort to exempt those facilities from the Field Act
  • Encourage seismic retrofit projects by supporting legislation to continue property tax incentives
Solid Graphic Licensure

Licensure

  • Eliminated oral format for CSE so that, beginning in 2009, candidates for licensure take the CSE in a computer-delivered setting six-days a week at 17 testing sites in California and 22 additional sites out-of-state
//successes by decade

2021-Present

Equity, Diversity and Inclusion - AB 342 (Valencia): AB 342 allows the California Architect Board (Board) to ask licensees to provide demographic information to the Board for the purposes of aiding in our Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) efforts.

Architectural Copyright Protection - SB 1214 (Jones): SB 1214 protects both the owners of architectural plans and local governments through the establishment of rules on how to share architectural plans with the public. 

Zero Net Carbon Design Education - AB 1010 (Berman): AB 1010 helps to prepare California architects to take a leadership position in accelerating the decarbonization of buildings in order to protect the health, safety, and welfare of all Californians. It does so by requiring architects to complete five hours of continuing education every two years in Zero Net Carbon design in order to renew their license.

2010-2020

Strongly supported the multi-year effort to enact meaningful reforms in state law that limits the obligation of a design professional to defend its client. Under SB 496, signed into law, a design professional’s share of defense costs cannot exceed its percentage of fault

Successfully sponsored legislation to make it easier for architects to service their communities as appointed volunteers on local government bodies, such as design review boards and planning commissions. With the enactment of SB 704, an architect cam recuse him/herself when there is a conflict of interest. Before the law went into effect, the only options for the architect was to resign the appointment or refuse the business contract

Successfully sponsored legislation, AB 630, that clearly states a person may not use an architect’s instrument of services without the written authorization of the architect.  This protects the architect when the architect’s client sells the land along with the approved set of plans to another person who has no contractual arrangement with the architect

Helped Defeat legislation that would have created an Interior Design Practice Act and an Interior Design Licensing Board

Helped craft the Certified Access Specialist Program provisions of SB 1186

Worked to ensure an insurable indemnification clause in contracts between architects and the Administrative Office of the Courts

2000-2009

Candidates for licensure can now take the CSE in a computer-delivered setting six-days a week at 17 testing sites in California and 22 additional sites out-of-state

Helped defeat legislation that would have created an Interior Design Practice Ace and added interior designers to the California Architects Board

The AIACC participated heavily in the development of CALGreen, advocating for the profession and blocking the efforts by competing interests to create code requirements that would have disadvantaged architects

Prohibits indemnification clauses in contracts with local government agencies from requiring the design profession be responsible for claims unless the damages are caused by the design professional’s negligence, recklessness, or willful misconduct.

Requires a school district that reuses architectural plans with a different architect to indemnify and hold harmless the original architect

Helped to craft the language of Senate Bill 262, the bill that required the State Architect (DSA) to establish a program for voluntary certification by the State of any person who meets the specified criteria as a Certified Access Specialist (CASp). Through the AIACC’s involvement architects were assured a priority position in the CASp requirements

Defines an architect’s use of the words “certify” or “certification” to mean an expression of professional opinion, and not a warranty or guarantee

1990-1999

Requires an architect to approve changes to architectural documents in writing in order for an architect to be held responsible for damages caused by those changes

If Prop o224 passes, it would have required all state-funded engineering or design projects be performed by government employees. Coalition members in the campaign defeated Prop 224, actively worked to ensure this initiative was voted down. This was a huge victory for all architects in California

Would have amended the State Board of Equalization Regulation 1506 to require architects pay an Architectural Services Tax on instruments of service

Ensured civils suits would be avoided by requiring architects to use a written contract – increasing the understanding between architects and clients

Establishes a one-step plan check for school in the Office of the State Architect, and consolidates building code approval with the Building Standards Commission

Eliminated the fear of liability for architects willing to voluntarily help local governments inspect buildings after natural disasters

1960-1989

Added an additional architect to the board to create parity between the members

Established legislation to help architects avoid frivolous lawsuits (amended 1983, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1995)

Enhanced the architectural profession and protected the public by moving the regulation of architects from a Title Act to a Practice Act

Skip to content